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Five reasons why right now may be the right time for immigration reform

(CNN) — Comprehensive immigration reform has so far eluded President Barack Obama. But with his re-election victory in battleground states propelled by strong Latino support, Democrats and Republicans in Congress have a stronger interest in cultivating support from a group with growing political clout.
Here are five reasons why the time may be right for immigration reform to take hold in Washington.
1) The voters have spoken
Immigration reform may not have been the biggest issue in the election — the economy was paramount — but it is very important to a key segment of voters. Latino voters turned out in force and helped to tip battleground states in Obama’s favor. The number of registered Latinos has increased by 26% in the past four years to 12.2 million, or 8.7% of all voters. That means this demographic will only increase its political power. Issues important to this minority logically will become increasingly important to both major political parties.

2) Obma promised but failed to deliver on immigration reform
Obama promised to push for immigration reform before the 2008 election and had to answer tough questions from Latinos about why that did not occur. At a forum by the Spanish-language Univision network, Obama was pressed to admit that he had fallen short and took responsibility for a lack of action. But the president also said he didn’t promise he would accomplish everything he wanted right away.
There also is some Latino disillusionment with the stalled Dream Act in Congress. This proposed law would create a path to citizenship for some young undocumented immigrants. Obama did sign an executive order that defers deportation for undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children, but it did not change current immigration law.
The president has said he is ready to act. He told the Des Moines Register in an interview before the election that he believes he will achieve immigration reform next year.
Opinion: How progress is possible
3) There is a bipartisan starting point
Having bipartisan support for immigration reform will not ensure passage — it didn’t for President George W. Bush in 2007 — but without it, chances are even slimmer.
Just days after the election, a leading Democrat and Republican announced that they hope to start debate this year. Sen. Charles Schumer of New York, the third-ranking Senate Democrat, and Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina say they will officially restart immigration reform talks that crumbled two years ago.
Schumer told NBC’s “Meet the Press” that he and Graham have a plan designed to appeal to interests on all sides of the highly contentious issue, and he’s optimistic that it can get through a Congress hobbled by political gridlock in recent years.
The plan includes four key elements: stronger border security, creation of forgery-resistant proof-of-citizenship documents, fairer legal immigration for desirable candidates, and a “tough love” path to citizenship for those already in the United States.
Opinion: Both parties must lead
4) Republicans want to win a larger share of the Latino vote
The election results thrust the immigration issue back into the spotlight partly because Republican nominee Mitt Romney won only 27% of the Latino vote compared to 71% for Obama.
Why Romney lost
The GOP wants to reverse the trend of decreasing Latino support at the ballot box. Already, Republican lawmakers, political commentators and thought leaders have adopted a more conciliatory tone when discussing immigration.
Carlos Gutierrez, the former commerce secretary who led Romney’s outreach to Latino voters, told CNN’s “State of the Union” the candidate “made some mistakes” during his campaign that ultimately led to a precipitous drop in Latino support.
The Republican primary process forced Romney to move to the right on immigration, something that didn’t sit well with many Latino voters. To avoid repeating the mistake, Republicans may consider working on immigration reform.
5) Democrats do not want to diminish their share of Latino vote
The Democratic Party benefited from Latino votes but that support is not assured in the future, especially if the Republicans move toward the center on immigration. The Obama administration is responsible for a record-setting number of deportations even as it has employed prosecutorial discretion to focus on high-priority cases. The Democrats will have to work with Republicans if they want to reform an immigration system both parties agree is broken.

Five reasons why right now may be the right time for immigration reform


(CNN) — Comprehensive immigration reform has so far eluded President Barack Obama. But with his re-election victory in battleground states propelled by strong Latino support, Democrats and Republicans in Congress have a stronger interest in cultivating support from a group with growing political clout.

Here are five reasons why the time may be right for immigration reform to take hold in Washington.

1) The voters have spoken

Immigration reform may not have been the biggest issue in the election — the economy was paramount — but it is very important to a key segment of voters. Latino voters turned out in force and helped to tip battleground states in Obama’s favor. The number of registered Latinos has increased by 26% in the past four years to 12.2 million, or 8.7% of all voters. That means this demographic will only increase its political power. Issues important to this minority logically will become increasingly important to both major political parties.

2) Obma promised but failed to deliver on immigration reform

Obama promised to push for immigration reform before the 2008 election and had to answer tough questions from Latinos about why that did not occur. At a forum by the Spanish-language Univision network, Obama was pressed to admit that he had fallen short and took responsibility for a lack of action. But the president also said he didn’t promise he would accomplish everything he wanted right away.

There also is some Latino disillusionment with the stalled Dream Act in Congress. This proposed law would create a path to citizenship for some young undocumented immigrants. Obama did sign an executive order that defers deportation for undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children, but it did not change current immigration law.

The president has said he is ready to act. He told the Des Moines Register in an interview before the election that he believes he will achieve immigration reform next year.

Opinion: How progress is possible

3) There is a bipartisan starting point

Having bipartisan support for immigration reform will not ensure passage — it didn’t for President George W. Bush in 2007 — but without it, chances are even slimmer.

Just days after the election, a leading Democrat and Republican announced that they hope to start debate this year. Sen. Charles Schumer of New York, the third-ranking Senate Democrat, and Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina say they will officially restart immigration reform talks that crumbled two years ago.

Schumer told NBC’s “Meet the Press” that he and Graham have a plan designed to appeal to interests on all sides of the highly contentious issue, and he’s optimistic that it can get through a Congress hobbled by political gridlock in recent years.

The plan includes four key elements: stronger border security, creation of forgery-resistant proof-of-citizenship documents, fairer legal immigration for desirable candidates, and a “tough love” path to citizenship for those already in the United States.

Opinion: Both parties must lead

4) Republicans want to win a larger share of the Latino vote

The election results thrust the immigration issue back into the spotlight partly because Republican nominee Mitt Romney won only 27% of the Latino vote compared to 71% for Obama.

Why Romney lost

The GOP wants to reverse the trend of decreasing Latino support at the ballot box. Already, Republican lawmakers, political commentators and thought leaders have adopted a more conciliatory tone when discussing immigration.

Carlos Gutierrez, the former commerce secretary who led Romney’s outreach to Latino voters, told CNN’s “State of the Union” the candidate “made some mistakes” during his campaign that ultimately led to a precipitous drop in Latino support.

The Republican primary process forced Romney to move to the right on immigration, something that didn’t sit well with many Latino voters. To avoid repeating the mistake, Republicans may consider working on immigration reform.

5) Democrats do not want to diminish their share of Latino vote

The Democratic Party benefited from Latino votes but that support is not assured in the future, especially if the Republicans move toward the center on immigration. The Obama administration is responsible for a record-setting number of deportations even as it has employed prosecutorial discretion to focus on high-priority cases. The Democrats will have to work with Republicans if they want to reform an immigration system both parties agree is broken.

Five simple tips to prepare your application package for deferred 

GUIDE FOR DREAMERS APPLYING FOR DACA

Supporting undocumented students in their pursuit of college, career and contribution

Most of you have tons of questions, most if not all of them can be answered through this guide! Please pass around, signal boost! 

Deferred Action Forms - IMPORTANT!! PLEASE READ BEFORE FILING OUT!

I know everybody is excited for tomorrow but I have an advice for some of you. TAKE YOUR TIME. I say that because there is only one chance with this application. If you get rejected, you are done. There is no appeal process and you can’t get them to reopen/reconsider your case (reapply) if you get rejected. I would much rather take my time and make sure everything on my application is 100% correct

 than rush to apply and make a mistake and get rejected. You can still apply next week or next month and there is no due date or deadline for the application. Talk to a lawyer if you have been trouble with the law or police before in the past, go get your background check if you’ve been in trouble before. Go get your passports and birth certificates and get it translated and go get all your necessary evidence. And to answer some common questions, no you will not be able to join the military or apply for FAFSA even if your Deferred Action is accepted. Good luck to everybody. - J. Kim

Today, President Obama announced that the policy of prosecutorial discretion—which allows immigration agents to defer deportation of low-risk, non criminal undocumented immigrants—will be expanded to all DREAM eligible youth.

This is a huge win for the immigration reform movement, and comes as a result of years of tireless mobilization and agitation by DREAMers, undocumented immigrants, and immigrants’ rights activists and politicians.

The expansion in policy means that effective today, there will be an immediate halt to all deportation proceedings for DREAMers, and all DREAMers who are already in deportation proceedings will get deferred action (lasting two years) and work permits, if they meet eligibility. Any DREAMer who meets the criteria can come forward and apply for deferred action and a work permit as well.

While this is an exciting moment for the immigration reform movement, it is not an ultimate victory. This policy expansion still does not provide a path to citizenship for DREAMers. There is still a dire need for a national DREAM Act. The struggle continues, and electing pro-DREAM champions into office this November is as important as it has ever been.

Here are some of the details of the new policy:

To be eligible you must

  •  Be between 15 years or older and 30 years or younger may apply
  •  Be in US for at least 5 (as of today, 6/15/12)
  •  Have to have maintained continuous residence (relatively flexible interpretation)

There are no restriction on when you can apply (i.e. no window that closes after a year, for example)
Grants of Deferred Application are for 2 years and are renewable
Criminal Ineligibility: If you have been convicted of a felony, a serious misdemeanor or three minor misdemeanors not all stemming from same incident, then you are not eligible.

We estimate that as a result of this policy extension, nearly 1 million DREAMers will be spared from deportation. This is truly an exciting day

The President will make a speech at 1:15PM EDT today.

BREAKING: Obama To Stop Deporting DREAM-Eligible Youth, Protecting 1 Million Undocumented Students

ariannabee:

“President Obama will announce a new immigration policy this morning that will allow some undocumented students to avoid deportation and receive work authorization.”

TELL ICE TO RELEASE CLAUDIO FROM DETENTION!

juansaaa:

Claudio Rojas is facing deportation to Argentina after being detained at Broward Transitional Center in Broward County, Florida. He has spent the last three months inside this detention facility, while his family continues to struggle to make ends meet fearing that Claudio may not return…

Six arrested in Arpaio protest won’t be deported, ICE says

univisionnews:


ICE officials said undocumented demonstrators arrested in Phoenix on Tuesday don’t fall under the agency’s enforcement priorities and won’t be deported. (Facebook: Diane Ovalle)

By JUAN GASTELUM
Channel: Immigration

Federal authorities said Wednesday they will not deport six undocumented immigrants arrested this week during a Phoenix, Ariz. protest against Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s immigration policies.

Read More

(Source: thisisfusion)

Undocumented youth in Arizona are ready to face off against Sheriff Joe Arpaio and you are invited to watch the action live on UStream | Dream Actvist

numol:

from the email they’re sending out about this [please tune in & pass this around if you can]:

For years now Sheriff Joe Arpaio has had full permission to do as he wishes with the undocumented community here in Arizona. And he has been pretty good at doing just that. Twice a month he conducts his version of raids, going into businesses and charging working families with felonies for attempting to put food on the table. He has put a lot of fear in the the community and now it is time for us to fight back.

Today, Rocio (17), Jackie (16), Viridiana (20), Daniela (20), Hugo (23) and Stephanie (18), will be coming out as undocumented and unafraid to demand an end to Arpaio’s career and they want you to watch it.

We’ll be going live at 3:00pm PST / 6pm EST. Be sure to tune in and join the fight against Arpaio’s out there who think they will forever hold our communities down. We need to fight back. We need to show them that, despite the fear, we are ready to confront them and take ownership of they same thing they think they can use against us, our fear.

Maybe you are not ready to fight back but you should definitely support those who are.

The youth coming out, if arrested, would be handed over to Sheriff Arpaio. At his jail they could be placed into deportation proceedings, but it is a risk they are willing to take. Will you support them?

Much love,

Mohammad
DreamActivist.org

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Opinion: Florida is in dire need of an immigration champion

univisionnews:

DREAM Act Protesters for President Obama's Visit to Austin
Could Sen. Marco Rubio be Florida’s next immigration
champion? (Flickr: Todd Dwyer) 

By JUAN ESCALANTE
Channel: Immigration, Politics

In the summer of 2009, I participated in my first legislative visit to one of my elected officials in Washington, D.C. Persuaded by the group of students that accompanied me, I was selected to be the person from the group to brief the office of Sen. Mel Martinez (R-FL) on why the DREAM Act was, and continues to be, a crucial piece of legislation for this country.

Read More